The Way to Get Booked on Top Podcasts - How I Did 50 Interviews In 6 Months

I’ve been on dozens of podcasts, probably over 50, including some of the top ones like

Entrepreneur on Fire  and The Top with Nathan Latka

Podcast are very important for your business, and in the video below I show you how to get on them, and why they are important.

But since I know a lot of you prefer reading over video, I will dedicate this blogpost  o you guys, by also explaining how to get on podcast in various steps.

Let’s begin!

 

Part One: How to find podcasts

There are two ways to do this; one is targeting the high profile podcast in your industry, and the other one is going after the new and noteworthy podcasts.

I recommend doing both strategies simultaneously, because the more interviews you have under your belt; the easier it’s going to be for you to sell people on the  odcast itself.

 

In order to get the list of most popular podcasts, I recommend using a tool like  Fancy Hands. In the video, you can see how I used them make an analysis on the most popular podcasts for startup founders and business owners, which I posted as a Google Doc linking from the video. Check it out!

After you have the podcasts, what happens is that if you reach out to these, you’ll see they’re also the most competitive, so they might not be back at you right away and it’s going to take longer to get you booked.

You will want to wait nonetheless, because those are also the ones that are going to stick around for months at a time, and for my experience, these are also the ones  hat are going to generate you leads.

However, there’s a whole another side of podcasts; I’m talking about the tiny ones where you still might get a lead or two, but you’re definitely going to get a backline to your site for SEO and a lot of practice in interviews. Also you’ll build a relationship with the podcast host, which in my experience has always turned out pretty well.

So, in order to find those new and noteworthy, I recommend going and hiring a freelancer on Upwork, you can see the exact script we use to hire in this platform in the video above (2:48).

What I like to do is hiring a bunch of people and see which ones do best. Once I select them I send a video to train them on how to scrape new and noteworthy business podcasts. 

You can have your freelancers fill out a list of podcasts, from where you can mark and select the podcasts that better suit your marketing niche; then you can start evaluating and reaching out to them. 

Part 2: Sending the email

Now that you have your list of podcasts, how do you pitch them in a way that’s going to get them to have you on the show?

I’ll show right now

Below is the exact email that I used to book a podcast in the past. It is the same template that I use for every podcast that I was on, including the big ones I mentioned earlier:

“Subject: Room for another interview?
Hey Kevin, just came across the podcast on new & noteworthy and went through the Swift episode. Love
what you`re doing and can`t wait to see where this goes!
I`m head of growth for a company called InspireBeats - we do fully managed sales and lead generation
for b2b companies. Naturally, we`re trying to get the word out :)
Since we target a similar group I think it would be quite interesting for your audience to hear some of
these insights:
* How we hire and vet candidates
* How we use cold emails for our recruiter clients to find interested companies, including email scripts
and the exact targeting
Does that sound interesting? Happy to workshop some ideas as well.
Thanks,
Alex”

 

Listen to five or six minutes of their podcast to try to get a feel for what is about, and if you don’t listen to podcasts at all, then listen to 5 or 6 episodes of theirs. 

Now think about your story and pitch 3 bullet points, 3 different things that their audience might get from an interview with you. After that, you finish with a call to action. 

That email I showed you has about 30% book rate, so for every hundred emails we send out, we’re getting 30 interviews on the calendar.

Feel free to use it; change up the words and make it your own, the basic structure is going to work for you.

Once you booked the podcast, remember to follow up. For Entrepreneur on Fire, I send the cold email and a month later, my follow up was about how my company grew up since the last time I wrote and how I wanted to share the story. We got booked

Now that you have your calendar filled with interviews, let’s go to part 3

Part 3: Prepare for the podcast

It’s important to prepare and have everything mapped out. I know some people are naturally good at interviews, but I find that if I have some bullet points of the topics want to hit, it always leads to a more successful podcast. 

We’ve had a lot of really good feedback from podcasts hosts about our interviews being some of the best, and it’s all because of this prep script I did, and that you can see in the video above (8:10). 

I wasn’t reading it word for word on the podcast, but by having it written out, I can basically do a podcast in any mind state. It’s also really good and handy to have if  you live in a different time zone.

If you’re going to create a script for yourself, think about what you’re pitching and map out all the points that you want users to take away. If you put in a doc all the value you want to add to the podcast, you’ll be able to naturally reference it after a bit of practice.

My first ever podcast interview was super awkward and low quality, but we got better over time. You can hear a clip of my first interview ever in the video compared to another clip where we were much better at it; it starts at the 9:40 mark so don’t miss it!

This was my ultimate guide to get on podcasts, if you enjoyed that feel free to implement what you’ve learned, and tell me about it in the video comments 

Until next time.

 

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